Josh Figueroa
Inorganic and Organometallic Chemistry: Synthesis, Small Molecule Activation and New Transformations.

Contact Information
Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Office: Pacific Hall 4224A
Phone: 858-822-7478
Email: jsfig@ucsd.edu
Web: figueroagroup.ucsd.edu
Group: View group members
Education
2005 Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2000 B.S., University of Delaware
Awards and Academic Honors
2014
Fellow, Royal Society of Chemistry
2012
Department of Energy Early Career Research Award
2012
Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award
2011
Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers
2011
Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow
2010
Royal Society of Chemistry Emerging Investigator
2010
Research Corporation, Cottrell Scholar Award
2010
Kavli Frontiers Fellow
2009
National Science Foundation CAREER Award
2009
Hellman Faculty Fellow, University of California
2007
Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Award
2005
National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow
2005
Davison Thesis Award, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Research Interests
Figueroa Group News via Twitter

Research in the Figueroa Group centers on the design and synthesis of highly tailored and reactive transition metal complexes for small molecule activation chemistry. A major focus is the development of new and useful transformations of stable small molecules such as N2, O2 and CO2. We hope to discover efficient means to utilize these abundant chemical feedstocks in transformations relevant to organic synthesis, industry and alternative energy. A second theme is the modulation and control of redox equivalents in chemical reactions through the explicit use of redox-active ligands and/or spectator agents.

Students in the Figueroa group will become well-versed in organic and inorganic synthetic methodologies. In addition, we routinely use a host of spectroscopic techniques including UV-vis, FTIR, EPR and multi-nuclear NMR. X-ray crystallography and quantum-chemical calculations (DFT) are also major components of our research effort and allow us to both predict and interpret molecules of interest.

Primary Research Area
Inorganic Chemistry
Interdisciplinary interests
Synthesis

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Selected Publications