Sailor, Michael
Nanomaterials: porous silicon, chemical and biological sensors, biomaterials, electrochemistry

Contact Information
Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Office: Pacific Hall 4140
Phone: 858-534-8188
Email: msailor@ucsd.edu
Web: sailorgroup.ucsd.edu
Group: View group members
Education
1988 Ph.D., Northwestern University
1983 B.S., Harvey Mudd College
Awards and Academic Honors
2013
Outstanding Alumnus Award, Harvey Mudd College
2013
Chancellor's Award for Postdoctoral Scholar Mentoring, UC San Diego
2012
Elected Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science
2010
Meritorious Civilian Service Award, United States Air Force
2008
J. Clarence Karcher Medal, University of Oklahoma
2006
Bronze Phantom Award” recipient from the Boeing Company, Phantom Works Division
2004
Outstanding Faculty Mentor in the Sciences and Engineering, UC San Diego Faculty Mentor Program
2004
Lipscomb Lecturer, University of South Carolina
2003
Grand Prize, National Inventors Hall of Fame Collegiate Inventors Competition
2003
63rd Frontiers In Chemistry Distinguished Lecturer, Case Western Reserve University
2002
“The Best of What’s New” general technology award winner, Popular Science Magazine
2002
Max T. Rogers Distinguished Lecturer, Michigan State University
1999
Annual Award for Architectural Research, Architecture® Magazine
1995
University of California Presidential Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research
1994-95
Camille Dreyfus Foundation Teacher-Scholar Award
1994-95
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow
1993-98
National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award
1993-94
Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation Young Investigator Award
Research Interests
Research in the Sailor group involves the chemistry, electrochemistry, and photophysics of nanophase semiconductors, with emphasis on photonic crystals, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, molecular sensors, and biomaterials. Our research focuses on applications in medical diagnostics, drug delivery, cancer treatment, high-throughput screening, and low-power sensing of environmental toxins, pollutants, and chemical or biological warfare agents.
Primary Research Area
Inorganic Chemistry
Interdisciplinary interests
Materials
Atmospheric and Environmental

Image Gallery


Magnetic, amphiphilic porous silicon microparticles used to carry and deliver nanoparticle, biomolecule, or drug payloads. Image: Liz Wu

This cross-sectional electron microscope image displays the porous nanostructure that was generated using a current-time etching waveform, depicted at the left. Image: Shawn O. Meade


Gradient photonic crystal etched into silicon. The porous silicon chip is used in sensing of pollutants and environmental toxins. Image: Adrian Garcia Sega
Selected Publications