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Mark Young
Mark Young

Dr. Young received his undergraduate A.B. degree from Princeton University in 1979. After a year of travel he earned a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1987, specializing in physical chemistry. He was a post-doctoral associate in the Chemistry Department at Colorado State University in 1988 and at the University of California, Berkeley Chemistry Department in 1989. He then took a position in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Iowa where he was on the faculty until 2018. Dr. Young also spent time as a visiting faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Colorado, Boulder in 1998 and was a visiting scientist at the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory in Richland, Washington in 2008. Dr. Young’s research interests include the optical properties of atmospheric aerosol, especially light absorbing organic particles of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. He is interested in the photochemistry of environmental surface waters and photochemical reactions involving atmospheric aerosol. The environmental fate of various pollutants, nanomaterials, and biological particles is also a subject of study. Dr. Young continues to develop mass spectrometric and optical techniques to detect and characterize atmospheric particulate matter and trace species in the air and water. Dr. Young has taught at all levels of the chemistry curriculum, ranging from introductory chemistry courses to graduate offerings in quantum mechanics. He has developed a number of courses, including a comprehensive environmental chemistry course, and produced a range of instructional materials, including a laboratory manual. Dr. Young will initially be teaching in the general chemistry sequence, the majors physical measurements laboratory, and environmental chemistry courses. He will also be involved in mentoring of undergraduates in independent study projects.

Jonathan Slade
Jonathan Slade

Dr. Slade received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Chemistry from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 2015, where he received the department’s best doctoral thesis award. He was subsequently a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Chemistry at Purdue University, where he led an NSF project as Principle Investigator to study the role of organic nitrates in new aerosol particle formation. Dr. Slade’s primary research interests are in the area of air pollution and atmospheric chemistry. His research at UCSD will build upon his previous experience in chemical kinetics, multiphase chemistry, and aerosol–climate interactions to unravel the fundamental chemical and physical processes involved in the formation, evolution, and toxicity of atmospheric aerosols, with an emphasis on coastal urban environments. He will teach courses in analytical and atmospheric chemistry, as well as instrumental analysis. In addition, Dr. Slade has extensive experience in educational outreach activities. While at Purdue University, he developed an outreach program for high school students to study indoor and outdoor air quality, and was keynote speaker for the NSF Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) national meeting. He plans to engage in similar outreach activities at UCSD.

Brian Leigh
Brian Leigh

Dr. Leigh received his Ph. D. in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 2009. He subsequently worked as a contractor on problems for the United States Intelligence Community. In 2011 he became an Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California San Diego where he performed research on behalf of the FBI and CIA on standoff detection of non‐nitro based explosives. In 2015 He joined the Forensic Exploitation Directorate and performed applied science in Afghanistan, and other hot‐spots, with the main focus of identifying Taliban and ISIS operatives and networks. Dr. Leigh will bring his experience in working in the field of national security to UCSD by augmenting courses and labs to reflect the cutting‐edge analytical forensics that are currently used. He also intends to initiate undergraduate research projects aimed at adding to the field of forensics. Dr. Leigh has been recognized for excellence in teaching as both and undergraduate student and as a graduate student. He has taught four classes previously at UCSD and received high CAPE scores. His previous outreach has been aimed at women in science but intends to broaden that by also working with military veterans.